Wind Energy

Global Warming – Wind Energy

by Anita

Global warming has had a big impact on our environment. Arctic ice is melting, making the sea level rise. Industrialization has increased the demand for electricity, which contributes to global warming. One way to solve the problem is to use clean energy.

Clean energy sources can be harnessed to produce electricity, heat, fuel and valuable chemicals with less impact on the environment. Wind power has been the fastest-growing energy source in the world since 1990. The old windmills you see on farms are the predecessors of today’s modern wind turbines. The modern design makes generating electricity much more efficient. The blades of the turbine are attached to a hub that is mounted on a turning shaft. The shaft goes through a gear transmission box where the turning speed is increased. The transmission is attached to a high-speed shaft, which turns a generator that makes electricity. A wind farm is a group of wind turbines in the same location to produce electricity. The best places to generate electricity are where there is a lot of wind. Places like that are at the seashore, windy plains, high mountains, and many other windy areas.

In order for a wind turbine to work efficiently, wind speeds usually must be above 12 to 14 miles per hour. Wind has to be this speed to turn the turbines fast enough to generate electricity. It provides many communities with a clean local source of electricity, which can help our environment, a whole lot. A single, smaller wind turbine can power a home or a school. It could be put on the roof to capture the most wind. This could help the downside of taking up too much land on the farms. Wind Power has taken electricity generating to a whole new level.

As a young scientist, I would build a small wind turbine on the top of my house to generate electricity for the entire house. That would benefit my house and the environment. If I became a scientist when I grow up, I could help solve the problem of global warming and polluting the environment.

References:

http://energyquest.ca.gov/story/chapter16.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsZITSeQFR0
http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/solutions/technologies/wind.html
http://www.alliantenergykids.com/EnergyandTheEnvironment/RenewableEnergy/022397
 
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Posted December 13, 2011 by sciencesavestheworld